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A superyachting guide to Asia Pacific cruising destinations, with sample itineraries
The Asia-Pacific is one of the last havens of untouched cruising in the world
 

CULTURE OF NEW ZEALAND

Maori culture is a crucial part of New Zealand’s identity and is an integral part of both the culture andlandscape
Culture - A superyacht guide to Asia Pacific cruising destinations, with sample itineraries
New Zealand’s culture is largely European interwoven with Maori and Polynesian traditions. Over four hundred years before Christopher Columbus and the rest of Europe worried about falling off the edge of the world, Maori people discovered and became the first inhabitants of Aotearoa New Zealand.

Today Maori culture is a crucial part of New Zealand’s identity and is an integral part of both the culture and landscape. Maori legend tells the story of how New Zealand came to be. Maui, a demi-god who lived in Hawaiiki, possessed magic powers that not all of his family knew about. One day Maui hid in the bottom of his brothers’ boat in order to go out fishing with them. Once out at sea, Maui was discovered by his brothers, but they were not able to take him back to shore as Maui made use of his magic powers, making the shoreline seem much further away than it was in reality.

Once they were far out into the ocean Maui dropped his magic fishhook over the side of the waka (canoe). After a while he felt a strong tug on the line. This seemed to be too strong a tug to be any ordinary fish, so Maui called to his brothers for assistance. After much straining and pulling, up suddenly surfaced Te Ika a Maui (the fish of Maui), known today as the North Island of New Zealand. Maui told his brothers that the Gods might be angry about this, and he asked his brothers to wait while he went to make peace with the Gods.

However, once Maui had gone his brothers began to argue among themselves about the possession of this new land. They took out their weapons and started pounding at the catch. The blows on the land created the many mountains and valleys of the North Island today. The South Island is known as Te Waka a Maui (the waka of Maui). Stewart Island, which lies at the very bottom of New Zealand, is known as Te Punga a Maui (Maui’s anchor), as it was the anchor holding Maui’s waka as he pulled in the giant fish
 
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